Farewell, mobile home furniture!

In my last post about starting the mobile home renovations, I mentioned that mobile home furniture DOES NOT like to be removed.

To quickly recap, mobile home furniture is designed not to move when the structure is in transit, which means that some items like the headboards in both bedrooms, the curtain pelmets, and the sofa, were attached to the wall from the other side, using heavy duty nails and staples. We can’t access the other side of the interior walls because the exterior of the mobile is constructed around it.

So how did we remove the furniture?

The short answer: a hammer, a wrecking bar and sheer brute force.

Goodbye, headboard

We started with the headboard, prising it off with the back of a hammer.

This left some holes and tears in the fabric of the wall. I thought it was going to be a challenge to fix…

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…but I left the room and came back later and father-in-law had filled the holes with Rawlplug Lite Filler and primed over them with Zinsser Bulleye 1-2-3 primer. I think he’s a wizard because he can fix anything.

See ya, sofa

Next to go was the sofa. You can see halfway through the video that fiancé and father-in-law have a conversation about how to take the sofa out in such a way that it can be salvaged. Realising that this sofa is not coming out in a salvageable state, father-in-law goes to his van and comes back with a hammer and a wrecking bar. See ya, ugly sofa.

Adios, fireplace

We want to install a solid-fuel stove so the bulky corner unit housing the gas fire had to go. Taking out this unit opened up more space in the living room.

Bye forever, curtain pelmets

The curtains were the first thing I took out of this mobile. I want to keep the rails, but I definitely want to replace those pelmets. The guys were able to take off the front panel of the pelmets, leaving the rails fully intact.

@Jenna

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